Fun with David Graeber

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Transcribed from This is Hell! Radio‘s 8 February 2014 episode and printed with permission.  Listen to the full interview here.

Play is, if anything, the basis of all physical reality, it’s the ultimate natural principle.  And if you think of the world that way, it’s a very different place.

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Contemporary Israeli Anarchism

Our anonymous interlocutor traces the prehistory and development of contemporary Israeli anarchism, touching on the origins of punk and the animal rights movement in Israel and presenting a critical analysis of the trajectory of Anarchists Against the Wall. He concludes by reflecting on the function of nonviolence rhetoric in the conflict between Israel and Palestine. We strongly recommend this interview to anyone interested in the Israel/Palestine conflict or, for that matter, in the strategic challenges of formulating an anarchist opposition in adverse conditions.Continue Reading

Bringing Militancy Back to LGBT Activism

“My biggest error, and to a certain extent the error of many contemporary LGBT activists, is in my analysis of what has made the continuing struggle for LGBT rights succeed—in some places—where other social justice struggles have failed.  It is an error that is referred to as white-washing: ignoring the effectiveness, even the existence of militancy, of messiness, of outright rebellion.”

By Antidote’s Ed Sutton

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After the Ball, Burschenschaften Explained

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In Austria, right wing extremism is having a ball

by Natascha Strobl for LeftEast

It is a sad fact that each year right-wing student fraternities, the Burschenschaften, are allowed to hold a ball in the Hofburg palace. It has grown into a major event on the yearly calendar of the Austrian and the wider European nationalist right. For those not familiar with all of Austrian or German history, these student fraternities need a bit of an explanation.
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Die Flucht – Die Herzlosen

Der nachfolgende Text wurde anlässlich einer Zugbesetzung geschrieben und den Passagieren per Lautsprechanlange vorgelesen. Ziel der Aktion war es, der Flucht eine Geschichte, und den Fliehenden eine Stimme zu verleihen. Vorgelesen wurde der Text von einer Aktivistin der Autonomen Schule Zürich (ASZ) und eines Mitglieds des A4-Infoshop Kollektiv Zürich.

Von AntiDote’s Laurent Moeri

Solidarität ist die Zärtlichkeit der Völker – Che

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Life and Work of Anarchist Omar Aziz

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OmarAzizOmar Aziz (fondly known by friends as Abu Kamel) was born in Damascus. He returned to Syria from exile in Saudi Arabia and the United States in the early days of the Syrian revolution. An intellectual, economist, anarchist, husband and father, at the age of 63, he committed himself to the revolutionary struggle. He worked together with local activists to collect humanitarian aid and distribute it to suburbs of Damascus that were under attack by the regime. Through his writing and activity he promoted local self-governance, horizontal organization, cooperation, solidarity and mutual aid as the means by which people could emancipate themselves from the tyranny of the state. Together with comrades, Aziz founded the first local committee in Barzeh, Damascus.The example spread across Syria and with it some of the most promising and lasting examples of non-hierarchical self organization to have emerged from the countries of the Arab Spring.

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Syria and the Euro-Leftist Double Impotency

Since the beginning of the Syrian revolution, many radical leftist groups and networks, both on the international and local levels in Europe and around the world, have engaged in a heated debate on whether to support the revolution or not, and whether it was a revolution or an imperialist conspiracy.

The European counterargument against the revolution had a quite telling approach that was different from many in the rest of the world. It wasn’t just the usual claim that the Assad regime is one of the last standing anti-imperialist forces. That claim became weaker in Europe after the aggravation of the regime crimes accompanied with hard-to-deny evidence of its brutality continuously coming out from Syria. But many within the European left over and over affirmed that they will not support what is happening in Syria until they find revolutionary forces worthy of their support. The difference in approach was in the claim that there was no third option that is “revolutionary” and that poses a substitute to both the Assad regime and the Islamist militias.

This approach wasn’t only problematic in its privileged laziness in not doing the needed effort to find these networks in Syria, but also in its White-tailored presets for what is a “better future” for the Syrians. Continue Reading