Unser Terrorismus-Tabu

Von Georg Meggle

Philosophischer Versuch zur Klärung und zur Verwendung des Terrorismus-Begriffs

The only hope of ever winning the “war on terrorism” lies in ceasing to invest in its bankrupt philosophy. – Jackson 2005

Mit diesem Beitrag verfolge ich drei Ziele: (1) Ich will erklären, was Terrorismus ist (T-Semantik); (2) ich will zeigen, an welchen Merkmalen unserer Verwendung dieses Begriffs es liegt, dass “Terrorismus” zu dem Kampf- und Killerbegriff par excellence avanciert ist (T-Pragmatik); und (3) ich will abschließend deutlich machen, dass mit dieser Diagnose bereits alles Nötige zur Erklärung unseres “Terrorismus”-Tabus gesagt ist.[1]Continue Reading

African Anarchism: An interview with the late Sam Mbah

AntiNote: This is a full transcript of an interview with Sam Mbah, recorded in March 2012 in Enugu Nigeria by Jeremy of the Jura Books Collective – an anarchist collective based in Sydney Australia. Sam Mbah, author of “African Anarchism”, a lawyer, activist and journalist passed away on November 6 2014, after complications arising from his heart condition. The world is worse without him. Many comrades and activists around the globe will be saddened to hear of this loss. Our thoughts are with Sam’s family and friends. We send our sympathy and condolences.

sam-mbah

Jeremy: It’s been about 15 years since the publication of your book on the prospects of anarchism in Africa. What is there, if anything, that comes to mind that you would add to or change about the book, and the ideas that you presented in it?

Sam: Yeah, I want to look at the ideas that I would add, not really change. Ever since the publication of the book I have been collecting additional materials that I stumble upon in the course of my writings and research. I think there is room for additions to the book, not really much to change, or subtract from the work. I think there is room for additions to the book, and this is something I have already started in the sense that in the Spanish edition that came out in 2000, I wrote an extensive foreword, wherein I tried to articulate some of the points we missed in the original book. I tried to look at more African societies that shared the same characteristics and features as the Igbo, the Tiv, the Efik, the Tallensi and the multiplicity of tribes and social groups that we have in Nigeria that I have already mentioned in the book. I also tried to explore other groups in other parts of the world especially Latin America, and I was able to draw some parallels between their social existence and systems of social organization, and the characteristics and features of anarchism, as I understand it.Continue Reading

Wer sind die Kommunisten wirklich?

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Von Carlos Pérez Soto, übersetzt aus dem Spanischen von Una Gatito

1. Im Jahr 1848 waren die Kommunisten diejenigen, die das Privateigentum an den Produktionsmitteln als den Ursprung der Übel des Kapitalismus ansahen. Karl Marx schlug vor, die bis dahin “Liga der Gerechten” genannte Vereinigung in “Liga der Kommunisten” umzubenennen, denn er verstand, dass es sich nicht nur um die Gerechtigkeit im Allgemeinen, in der Manier einer moralischen Forderung handelte, sondern dass es darum ging, eine direkte politische Opposition zum herrschenden System als Ganzes zu organisieren.

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Who are the Communists Really?

By Carlos Pérez Soto, translated from spanish by Una Gatito

espanol, deutsch

1. In 1848, the communists were those who saw the private property of the means of production as the origin of capitalism’s evils. Karl Marx proposed to call “League of the Communists” to what until then was known as the “League of the Just”, because he understood that it wasn’t only about justice in general, in the manner of a moral demand, but that the issue was organizing a direct political opposition to de ruling system as a whole.

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¿Quiénes son realmente los comunistas?

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Por Carlos Pérez Soto

1. En 1848 los comunistas eran los que veían a la propiedad privada de los medios de producción como origen de los males del capitalismo. Carlos Marx propuso llamar “Liga de los Comunistas” a la que hasta entonces se llamaba “Liga de los Justos” porque entendió que no sólo se trataba de la justicia en general, a la manera de una exigencia moral, sino que el asunto era organizar una oposición directa, política, al sistema dominante como conjunto.

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Unschooling, the Sixties, and Today’s Left

Transcribed from This is Hell! Radio‘s 3 June 2006 episode and printed with permission.  Listen to the full interview, replayed in March 2014 (due in equal part to Astra Taylor’s prescient statements and her recent reappearance into sociopolitical discourse; more on that soon), here.

1999 is between 1969 and 2006, numerically speaking

1999 is between 1969 and 2006, numerically speaking

“I’m fascinated by the way the Right has appropriated the methods of the 1960s Left.”

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What is Domination? What is Liberation?

AntiNote: We are pleased to present the first in a limited run of selections from the brief life of the Smiley and West podcast, which has kindly given us the nod to print portions of their work.

One of the last interviews they did was with Princeton professor Jeffrey Stout. A longtime colleague of Cornel West, he shared some ideas from his own work examining the structures of social movements and the dynamics of domination.

His comments about movements’ fundamental duties—to engage in long processes of face-to-face organizing, as well as to develop and adhere to broad visions of the world they are fighting to create (one free of domination)—touch on topics of major concern to the AntiDote Writers Collective.

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Reading ‘World Systems Analysis’ in Tehran

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Transcribed from This is Hell! Radio‘s 22 March 2014 episode and printed with permission.  Listen to the full interview here.

Image source: Culture Bites blog

Image source: Culture Bites blog


“Immanuel Wallerstein resonates in Iran because he not only combines all the great intellectual traditions of European and American social science, but he uses them to challenge the status quo.”

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An Assault on the Mind

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AntiNote: The following is an extended excerpt of a radio interview, edited for readability.

On 8 March 2014,  Chuck Mertz of This is Hell! Radio (Chicago) talked to educator and author Henry Giroux about neoliberalism’s role in the gradual perversion of public and higher education as well as of the dominant media culture.

“I don’t think we need to educate people to simply abide by the rules.  We know where that goes.”

For the first time since embarking on this project of providing print versions of podcast interviews—something we view as filling two crucial needs of a still inchoate alternative media landscape: putting collaboration before competition (for we will not overcome dominant media culture by imitating it), and amplifying voices nearly unheard outside of a niche but revolutionary format—we have received specific transcription requests for this interview.

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“The World We Live in Is Created by Slavery”

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AntiNote: The following is an extended excerpt of a radio interview, edited for readability.

On 15 February 2014,  Chuck Mertz of This is Hell! Radio (Chicago) talked to Greg Grandin about his recent book The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom and Deception in the New WorldGrandin asks us to acknowledge, reexamine and confront the legacy of slavery—in all its historical forms but in particular the brutal example of the trade on the Middle Passage—in our assessment of current political, social, and economic relations and institutions.

Looking out from AntiDote’s home base in Europe (where a torrid and nearly unchallenged ascent of racist ideologies across the Continent can truly no longer be denied), and Switzerland in particular (where a referendum tightening immigration policy passed last month, accompanied by an across-the-board denial that the vote had anything to do with racial discrimination), we are moved to remind our readers that the philosophical lessons Grandin sets out are applicable not only in North America, as so many here—not without an air of relief and reproach—seem to think, but everywhere.

SlaveTrade01

In the 1770s the Spanish began to use phrases associated with today’s society—they began to privatize and deregulate the slave trade.

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