Αθήνα Burns

Von AntiDote’s Laurent Moeri

Das Original erschien im Juni 2010 in der Volksstimme (Österreich)

Als erstes möchte ich Dir ganz liebe Grüβe von deinem neuen Freund ausrichten. Sodiris ist 12 Jahre alt und lebt in Exarchia und hat uns gestern beim Bau eines Spielplatzes geholfen.

Navarinou+Park+Athens+2009

Exarchia ist ein baulich herunter gewirtschaftetes Quartier der Innenstadt Athens, dessen Geschichte die Wände am Besten erzählen.  Schwarz-rote Sprayerein dominieren das Landschaftsbild. Forderungen und Drohungen an den Staat,  Aufrufe zu Demonstrationen, internationale Solidaritätsbotschaften und Anarchiezeichen. Eine Art Fingerabdrücke der Bewohner und Besucher. Die Krise steht hier deutlich an den Wänden geschrieben, wohl schon lange bevor sie in unseren Nachrichten erschien.

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Fifty Shades of Brown

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The overthrow of the authoritarian regime of Yanukovych by no means signifies for us the end of our fight. New dictators hasten to take the place of the Party of Regions. They will not hesitate to rely not only on considerably weakened security agencies, but on the far right militants as well. The regime of police and prosecutorial arbitrariness deserved its overthrow unconditionally, but now there may come a time for a new terror that will justify itself ideologically.Continue Reading

Toward Utopia

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Exploring the potential and the limits of anarchism: a long bike ride to Athens

Everything in Exarchia gets lent and borrowed, everything gets traded.  Above all perhaps the most valuable asset: time.

by AntiDote’s Laurent Moeri

 2011 was the year of Occupations.  From Cairo, through Athens, to New York, Frankfurt and Zürich, people grabbed their tents and made themselves some space to voice their grievances.  But not only that—they established free spaces in which, away from commercialized party politics, they reclaimed the empty husk of democracy and began filling it with life again.

At first glance, the uprisings against dictatorship in North Africa and the waves of protest through Western metropoles didn’t appear to have much in common.  Yet they were unified in their impulse to break out of coercive, repressive structures.
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Fuck them, they make three thousand a month

This text originally appeared on 9.2.2014 at http://www.lupiga.com/vijesti/glasnik-pregazene-generacije-o-sarajevskim-neredima

By Faruk Šehić, recipient of the European Union Prize for Literature

What actually happened that Friday 7th of February, what wild force was it that had awoken in the people and taken control of the streets surrounding the buildings of the Presidency of BiH and the Canton of Sarajevo? The day before, it had begun in front of the building of the cantonal government during one in a long line of workers’ protests. Amateur footage on the internet documented police brutality and police ineptitude to deal with the situation which quickly escalated. It was to be expected that Friday would be even worse and with even more tension than that first day when the uprising began spreading through the streets of Tuzla. Around noon on the Friday, the building of the cantonal government in Tuzla was set ablaze. After I saw that on state TV, I headed toward city centre.

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Decolonising Anarchism

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By Budour Hassan

The appearance of the Egyptian Black Bloc in Cairo’s streets in January 2013 triggered gullible excitement in Western anarchist circles. Little thought was given to the Egyptian Black Bloc’s political vision – or lack thereof – tactics, or social and economic positions. For most Western anarchists, it was enough that they looked and dressed like anarchists to warrant uncritical admiration. Facebook pages of Israeli anarchists were swamped with pictures of Egyptian Black Bloc activists; skimming through the US anarchist blogosphere during that period would have given one the impression that the Black Bloc was Egypt’s first-ever encounter with anarchism and anti-authoritarianism. But as American writer Joshua Stephens notes, the jubilant reaction many Western anarchists have towards the Black Bloc raises unflattering questions concerning their obsession with form and representation, rather than content and actions.Continue Reading

Protests Across Bosnia Are A “Collective Nervous Breakdown”

“He who sows hunger reaps anger,” warned the red graffiti on a Sarajevo government building this week. The message hinted at the depth of poverty and disillusionment in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) that has driven people to join demonstrations across the divided country, where the unemployment rate is about 40 percent. Protesters have since stormed and ransacked government buildings in Tuzla, Zenica, Mostar, and in the capital city of Sarajevo, where the headquarters of the presidency was also set ablaze. Some protesters allegedly threw firecrackers and stones at police, who responded with rubber bullets and tear gas. Hundreds have been injured. On Friday, activist Darko Brkan called the protests “a collective nervous breakdown”.Continue Reading

For a Theory of Destituent Power

This is the transcript of a public lecture by Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben delivered to a packed auditorium in Athens on November 16, 2013 and recently published by Chronos.

Invitation and organization by Nicos Poulantzas Institute and SYRIZA Youth

Giorgio Agamben

A reflection on the destiny of democracy today here in Athens is in some ways disturbing, because it obliges us to think of the end of democracy in the very place where it was born. As a matter of fact, the hypothesis I would like to suggest is that the prevailing governamental paradigm in Europe today is not only non-democratic, but that it also cannot be considered political. I will try, therefore, to show that European society today is no longer a political society: it is something entirely new, for which we lack proper terminology.  We have therefore to invent a new strategy.Continue Reading

Bringing Militancy Back to LGBT Activism

“My biggest error, and to a certain extent the error of many contemporary LGBT activists, is in my analysis of what has made the continuing struggle for LGBT rights succeed—in some places—where other social justice struggles have failed.  It is an error that is referred to as white-washing: ignoring the effectiveness, even the existence of militancy, of messiness, of outright rebellion.”

By Antidote’s Ed Sutton

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Der Utopie entgegen

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Das Potenzial und die Grenzen des Anarchismus ausloten: Von einer langen Radtour nach Athen

Von Antidote’s Laurent Moeri

Zweitausendelf war das Jahr der Platzbesetzungen. Von Kairo über Athen bis nach New York, Frankfurt und Zürich ergriffen Bürger ihre Zelte und verschafften ihrem Unmut Platz. Aber nicht nur das: Sie errichteten auch Freiräume, in denen sie sich, fernab von kommerzialisierter Parteipolitik, wieder anmassten, die entleerte Hülle der Demokratie mit Inhalten zu füllen. Die Aufstände gegen die Diktaturen Nordafrikas und die Protestwellen in westlichen Metropolen scheinen auf den ersten Blick wenig gemeinsam zu haben. Und doch: Vereint werden sie durch das Verlangen, aufoktroyierte und unterdrückende Strukturen zu durchbrechen.Continue Reading

After the Ball, Burschenschaften Explained

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In Austria, right wing extremism is having a ball

by Natascha Strobl for LeftEast

It is a sad fact that each year right-wing student fraternities, the Burschenschaften, are allowed to hold a ball in the Hofburg palace. It has grown into a major event on the yearly calendar of the Austrian and the wider European nationalist right. For those not familiar with all of Austrian or German history, these student fraternities need a bit of an explanation.
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