Excuse Me Mister, How Far Is It from Simferopol to Grozny?

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by Antidote’s Laurent Moeri

“When the battle is over and the martyrs sleep, the cowards emerge from the alleys to tell us of their heroism.” – Graffiti in Homs, Syria
Prelude – Mission Impossible

What follows is an attempt at the impossible: a critical review of the situation in Ukraine, the involvement of Putinʼs Russia, and the international Leftʼs capacity (or lack thereof) to respond to social uprisings without repeating prescribed narratives. It is written on one sole premise: that the victims of an eventual military escalation in Ukraine will predominantly be ethnic minorities such as the muslim Crimean Tatars, marginalized groups such as the Sinti and Roma, and the working class—while bureaucrats in Brussels and the Czar and his clan in Moscow will continue to further their respective interests. To highlight the likelihood of this prediction, a comparison will be made between events in Chechnya and Crimea.Continue Reading

DISCULPE SEÑOR – ¿QUÉ DISTANCIA HAY ENTRE SIMFERÓPOL Y GROZNY?

El siguiente texto es un extracto de “Excuse me Mister – How Far is it from Simferopol to Grozny?Para leer el texto completo en Inglés, haz clic aquí.

Por Laurent Moeri de Antidote. Traducido al Español por un gato cualquiera.

IV. El eslabón faltante: Chechenia y Crimea

“Terek on his stones is fretting / With a troubled roar;
Wild Chechen, his dagger whetting, / Crawls along the shore.
But your father knows war’s riot, / Knows what he must do.
Sleep, my darling, sleep in quiet, / Bayushki-bayu.”
– popular Cossack lullaby written by the Russian Poet Lermontov
Llamar a alguien negro, en referencia a su color de piel, puede que sea un término políticamente aceptable en EE.UU. En Rusia, sin embargo, el término “negro” (en ruso: чурок, chyrock, chyrka) es usado de una manera muy peyorativa y racista, y fue utilizado a lo largo de la historia de la Unión Soviética para diferenciar entre los “eslavos étnicos leales” y los “rebeldes, incivilizados no-eslavos”. La maquinaria propagandística soviética declaraba que “los chechenos son animales salvajes que algún día morirán en la inmundicia y la pobreza si el Ejército Rojo no los civiliza”, y, con el fin de asimilarlos a la cultura soviética, debían ser “emancipados del islam y de sus tradiciones bárbaras” …y ser deportados a la fuerza.
"Don't buy from the Blacks!"

“Don’t buy from the Blacks!”

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Gespräch mit dem syrischen Anarchisten Nadir Atassi

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Der Anteil der syrischen AnarchistInnen am Aufstand gegen das Regime von Assad mag quantitativ nicht bedeutend sein, sollte aber trotzdem eigentlich ein Bezugspunkt für eine europäische Linke sein bei der Fragestellung, wen man/frau/…. denn eigentlich in diesem scheinbar unübersichtlich gewordenen Konflikt unterstützen könne.

In der aktuellen Graswurzelrevolution ist ein Interview mit dem syrischen Anarchisten Nadir Atassi auf deutsch erschienen, das wir im Folgenden dokumentieren.

Laut einem kürzlich im Magazin Fast Company erschienenen Artikel, gibt es ein breites und vielfältiges Netzwerk unbewaffneten, demokratischen Widerstands gegen Assads Regime, das von lokalen politischen Initiativen, KünstlerIInnenkoalitionen, Menschenrechtsorganisationen, gewaltfreien Gruppen und so weiter getragen wird. (Die Syria Nonviolence Movement erstellte eine interaktive Karte , die das komplexe Verbindungsnetzwerk zeigt.)Continue Reading

Two Refugee Camp Sieges

by Tamim Al-Barghouti

The Yarmouk camp for Palestinian refugees in Damascus has been under siege for months, exposed to ground and air strikes, causing several of the refugees to die of starvation and resort to eating leaves and cacti, as well as the spread of intestinal and skin diseases due to the lack of clean water.

This has also resulted in the death of new-borns, their mothers, the elderly, the ill and the wounded because of the shortage of medicine. Anyone trying to leave the camp is killed and the camp has been bombed numerous times.

Refugee camp in Damascus, Syria

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Photo Essay: Clashes in Kiev

AntiNote: These photographs were taken over two days in Kiev last week, 22 and 23 January 2014, by citizen photographer Ilya Varlamov.  He posted them today on livejournal, with his own commentary.

We have selected a few of the more impressive images, and have included Varlamov’s captions where appropriate.  He warns that Western media’s impressions of last week’s reactionary escalations in Kiev are largely mythological and exaggerated. 

Nonetheless, AntiDote takes seriously the analyses of our comrades working with New Left groupings in Eastern Europe, which argue that the Euromaidan movement and opposition to Viktor Yanukovych’s corrupt government have been increasingly instrumentalized by radical rightwing and nationalist groups.  We caution our readers to maintain a healthy skepticism, and we by no means intend to offer support or encouragement to forces with racist, chauvinist, militaristic, or totalitarian designs.

Please click on each image for a closer look.

I came to Kiev to see for myself what is happening here. Of course, an hour after arriving at Maidan, you begin to understand that everything you've read in dozens of articles and seen in TV news reports is total crap. With these photographs I will try, as objectively as possible, to sort out this new wave of the Kiev revolution.

I came to Kiev to see for myself what is happening here. Of course, an hour after arriving at Maidan, you begin to understand that everything you’ve read in dozens of articles and seen in TV news reports is total crap. With these photographs I will try, as objectively as possible, to sort out this new wave of the Kiev revolution.

Continue Reading

Revolution within the revolution

Leila's blog

Those that have bought into regime narratives that it is engaged in an existential battle against Al Qaeda terrorists must be feeling a little confused this week.

Revolutionary activists have long been protesting against the Islamic State of Iraq and Sham (ISIS), known locally as Daesh, the main Al Qaeda affiliated group in Syria.[1]

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